Keeping calm in times of crisis

When crisis comes, it’s critical to remember the calm center within, and hold onto that light for yourself and others.

Happy March 2020, Dear Readers. February was filled with intensity, crisis after crisis, and where I live, winter storms that came one after another. The world is now facing a pandemic via the outbreak of the Covid 19 strain of Coronavirus, which at the moment has entered about 60 countries, affected nearly a hundred thousand people, and killed several thousand. I’m not gonna lie, this is seriously scary news to deal with on all levels. Headlines over the weekend stated that people in the United States were buying up face masks in an effort to protect themselves, and the head of the Center for Disease Control has urged everyone to stop buying them, as fears increase that public health workers may not end up having the protective equipment they need in order to do their work.

In a moment of collective anxiety over the transmission of a potentially deadly virus such as this, it is easy to forget that humans live amongst all kinds of germs, viruses and bacteria 24/7. True, the vast majority of them don’t have the potential to kill us as we walk around in our daily lives. The past week brought the whole subject of germs and hygiene into sharp focus for me, so I thought I’d share a personal story with you.

As it happened, my eldest daughter who is in her mid-20s, became very ill with nausea, vomiting and severe intestinal pain early last week. After having a miserable night of suffering, her boyfriend brought her to the emergency room of our city’s central hospital the following morning. She spent most of the day in the ER, as the doctors took samples of blood and urine, and did a CT scan to figure out what was going on with her. They also gave her strong pain medicine, put her on IV drips for dehydration and antibiotics, and took turns coming into the room to let us know what they had found out throughout the afternoon. Turns out she had an unusual presentation of an appendicitis, along with extreme inflammation of her upper GI tract, which was obstructing the normal flow of her colon, causing severe abdominal pain. That evening she was admitted to the observation floor of the hospital, and moved to a room where nurses watched over her, administered medicine by IV and injections, and did what they could to make her comfortable for the following three nights and days. A surgical team of doctors checked in with us each morning, giving updates on her condition as we waited to see how she responded to the very strong antibiotics she was being given. Because of all the inflammation surrounding the appendix, the lead surgeon felt it would not be wise to perform an appendectomy right away. It became a waiting game as they sought to determine whether they should operate and remove her appendix. So my daughter spent the week in the hospital bed, suffering through many hours of pain, diarrhea, nausea, and just generally feeling pretty awful. She was not allowed to eat or drink any fluids for the first 24 hours, and then only allowed food, after two days of fasting, for a few hours before they restricted any more, thinking they would do exploratory surgery the next day.  Many more hours of no food nor drink followed; however, the doctors eventually decided not to do the surgery after taking a second CT scan two days after the first one.

My daughter is very fortunate in that she has a loving, caring family and friend group who were with her, often in shifts, throughout her hospital stay. I came each morning and stayed with her through the day. Her dad and sister came in the afternoons and stayed into the night. Her boyfriend came in the evening and stayed, sleeping in the lounger chair next to her bed at night. Friends came, bringing flowers, cards, various kinds of food and drinks in hopes she could eat and drink, told stories and made her smile. Slowly, her pain lessened, the inflammation was reduced, and by the end of the week she had improved to the point that the doctor put her on oral antibiotics and finally released her from the hospital.

This week was one of the most stressful I’ve experienced in many years. It was so unnerving to not know what was happening inside my daughter’s body and whether or not the doctors would perform the surgery, since it seemed they kept changing their minds. There were frustrating communication gaps between the lead doctor, her team, the nurses and the night resident who would come and give conflicting information to us. For the first part of her stay, every time a nurse or nurse assistant would come in the room, they put on disposable suits and wore masks over their faces. Only after a couple of days did we find out that was a precaution because they didn’t yet know if she had a contagious infection. Once the lab results came back negative on that, they stopped wearing those suits and masks each time they came in. Then there was the worry hanging over the atmosphere of “germs being everywhere,” while I became obsessed with handwashing and sanitizing everything I touched, like door handles, toilet flusher, faucet handles, and every surface became suspect of possibly holding harmful bacteria. I got so deep into the anxiety of germaphobia that I’d come home from the hospital at night and take off everything I wore, took super-hot showers, and started worrying about possible germs lurking in my own apartment. This past week was an In-My-Face example of examining how my thoughts contributed my state of consciousness and emotional state of being. The more I focused on the frightening germs that seemed to be everywhere within the hospital, the harder it became to remain calm and strong for my daughter’s healing process. I had distinct moments when I held my hands over her torso and tried with all my might to energetically suck the sickness from her and give it over to the healing angels whom I knew were also there with us in the hospital room. I believe it helped her somewhat to be in a state of prayer and meditation around her healing, along with all those antibiotics they kept pumping into her body. I know healing works on all levels—physical, mental, emotional and etheric. But for me personally, the most difficult part was fighting the irrational fear that kept cropping up of catching the bad germs that were all around us.

This personal story brings me back to the original point of this blog post—the Covid 19 epidemic that is sweeping through the world, and especially the collective fear that its presence is bringing so palpably into focus. For so many centuries of our collective memory, we have fought epidemics of one horrible disease after another. The fear of death and suffering through contagious diseases is still alive within our DNA, so how can we best fight those fears and evolve beyond them? Because that is exactly what we must do now. Dear Readers, I don’t have a solid answer to these concerns, other than to keep realizing that we are powerful beings of light having a human experience in these most extraordinary times. We must trust that kind, helpful, smart humans are all around us, helping those of us who become ill. The angelic realm is always here, ready to help us as soon as we remember to ask for support. The vast majority of the time, we do have the strength and courage to look our fears in the eye, and realize that fear is the old acronym—false evidence appearing real. We are powerful, and the more light we can gather, ground and radiate out to the world, the more inoculated we become against the world’s ills and disease. So, as the past week showed me so clearly, the most important thing we can each do is to keep calm and do what we can to be the steady presence for others, no matter what arises.

 

The Shakedown of False Belief Systems

hurricane-patricia-antimatter-gamma-positrons
image via Sciencealert.com

The vortex energies of January are swirling. Everyone feels them, whether they are conscious of them or not. People’s nerves are frayed, anxiety levels are skyrocketing, many are feeling helpless, hopeless or both. It doesn’t seem to matter where you are on the planet, how much money you possess, or your position in society. This world is shaking loose of its foundations, and it’s happening fast.

As you look around and observe your part of the world, what signs of major change are you experiencing? Is it unnerving you a bit (or perhaps a lot)? Many of us here in the United States have been watching or listening to the Senate’s impeachment managers present their arguments for impeachment and removal of President Trump. There has been copious amounts of evidence presented through many grueling hours of argument brought forth for all 100 US senators to consider. Senator Adam Schiff, head of the impeachment management team, spoke passionately and eloquently on behalf of protecting the United States Constitution, as he made their case that to allow this president to walk away and be acquitted of wrongdoing in spite of the huge amount of evidence against him, is tantamount to crushing the very foundations of democracy that the United States was built upon 233 years ago,

Schiff evoked Senator Bobby Kennedy as he stated, “Few are willing to brave the disapproval of their fellows, the censure of their colleagues and the wrath of their society. And then I understood by that measure just how rare moral courage is.

“One of the things that we in this fellowship of office holders understand (that most people don’t) is that real political courage doesn’t come from disagreeing with our opponents, but from disagreeing with our friends and with our own party because it means having to stare down accusations of disloyalty and betrayal.”

Schiff closed his remarks by imploring Republican senators to permit new testimony before rendering a final verdict. He reminded them of “how unforgiving history can be” before closing his speech with a plea: “I ask you, I implore you, give America a fair trial. Give America a fair trial. She’s worth it.”  You can watch Senator Schiff’s closing remarks here. It is worth the time, for those of you interested in seeing modern American history being made.

During his closing remarks, Schiff spent time predicting how the Trump defense team would present their defense. I am pretty certain his predictions will be spot on. Tragically, it will most likely be the case that none of the Republican senators, who have the majority in Congress, will vote their conscience (if any of them even have any conscience left) and side with the Democrats for impeachment.  Senator Schiff’s warnings will go unheeded, and Trump will probably remain in power for the remainder of his presidency in 2020. BUT. The presidential elections that will take place in November very well may (as many hundreds of thousands of us here in America pray they will) see the outworking of the impeachment trial in the form of the Democratic party seizing power in the White House and in the Senate. Schiff commented in his speech that Americans are intelligent and are paying close attention to how the senators will vote, and they will remember and vote accordingly. Obviously we will have to wait until November to find out if his prediction is accurate.

But there is another aspect to the changes I’d like to mention here, dear Readers. We are living through a moment in our history that is hyper-emotionally charged. In fact, it is not difficult to see that there are different realities competing for our attention on a daily and even moment-by-moment basis. Looking through the websites of news outlets such as the New York Times, Newsweek and CNN this evening, what is clearly apparent is simply the overwhelming amount and diversity of stories all vying for our attention. When I step back from my emotionality and feelings of right vs. wrong, I can see that the whole thing is one big ludicrous show. Our world is an immense stage or movie set, made up of millions upon millions of mini-shows being acted out nonstop. Seeing the world from the higher perspective, it becomes somewhat easier to breathe. The despair I feel at the state of not only America’s demise, but the state of our planet and its failing ecosystems, somewhat abates when I am able to step back and see the show for what it actually is, realizing once more that I am not responsible for all the tragedies of this world. What is my responsibility then? Every thoughtful person must turn within to reflect on this important question, and find one’s own answer. It is all of our responsibility to not look away, not deny what we plainly see before us. The problems humanity faces are immense and threaten all that we hold dear, including our very lives as a species on Earth.

The decade we’ve just entered will, I predict, shake each of us down to our very core, exposing the lies and darkness that still remain to be brought to the light of Truth. This light is intended to heal what needs healing, which involves crisis. Find your calm center, gather your support team around you, and remember to keep breathing.

https://www.newsweek.com/adam-schiff-respect-trends-powerful-closing-speech-1483998